Monday, August 12, 2013

Early August Edition-Nonprofit Imperative E-Newsletter


Nonprofit Imperative
Your nonprofit browser
August 2013
Twitter: NonprofitsNews
The twice-monthly newsletter dedicated to:
  • exposing the crisis in nonprofit fraud leadership…a crisis of pervasive and monumental waste, fraud, abuse, mismanagement, and malfeasance throughout the charitable sector which costs taxpayers and contributors tens of billions of dollars annually; and,
  • seeking reforms that will restore the public’s lost confidence in the sector.
What’s Included:
Skunk of the Month:
Warrington Community Ambulance; Autism foundation
Charity Check Up:
Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizen’s Council
A Thought or Two:
Background Checks, Please (again); Honoree in Fraud
Nonprofit News-In Case You Missed It:
PENN State agreement; Livestrong…more
Political/Official Chicanery:
NY; NM; VT; UT; IL; DC; AZ; CA; RI…more
What Do You Think?

Having spent almost thirty years in direct service and then nonprofit management, before I joined Charity Navigator, I was struck by the amount of questionable, unethical and outright fraudulent practices undertaken by many nonprofit leaders. My five years at Charity Navigator has only reinforced my impression that the problem of nonprofit fraud as well as questionable activities is significant and the sector has yet to take it as seriously as it should.” (Ken Berger, President & CEO of Charity Navigator, in  ken's commentary)
Skunk of the Month…
                             Skunk of the Month is the twice-monthly designation made by Nonprofit Imperative, the organization dedicated to eliminating waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement in nonprofits and government. The Skunk of the Month award is given to charities and government officials who show blatant disregard for the interests and trust of contributors and taxpayers. This month’s example is:
“They came to do good and they did very well indeed.”
Another, All Too Common, Gambling Related Fraud
Following her bankruptcy on debts including $201,000 in mortgages and vehicle loans, more than $178,000 in personal loans and credit card debt and nearly $40,000 owed to Harrah’s, Borgata and Trump casinos Danette Lewchick was further rewarded with being selected the Warrington Community Ambulance’s financial secretary in 2008. By April, she was in control of the nonprofit’s finances. In a quick four-year period, she blew through $642,000 from the nonprofit all at casinos.
The investigation revealed that between January 2008 and July 2012 Lewchick wrote checks to herself or to be cashed, increased her paychecks beyond what she should have received and even made direct withdraws from the ambulance accounts, including many at a Parx Casino ATM. 
Throughout the scheme, Lewchick maintained the appearance that the ambulance company’s finances were running smoothly by altering reports to account for the missing money. Occasionally she would alter the records to show duplicate payments to the same vendor — as if splitting the monthly cost into two payments, when in fact, she was paying the vendor once and herself once, according to authorities.
Autism Charity Deemed One Of The Worst
IRS tax documents show that from 2009 to 2011, the Autism Spectrum Disorder Foundation raised $7.6 million through its fundraisers. More than 90 percent of that was paid directly to for-profit solicitation companies hired by the charity. It is one of the worst charities in America when it comes to spending large amounts of cash on for-profit solicitation companies based on the Tampa Bay Times and its reporting partner, the Center for Investigative Reporting.
A Charity Check Up:
N.Y. Council Ignores History Of This Charity: Gives It Tons Of Money
The Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, a nonprofit founded by former New York Assemblyman, Vito Lopez, received $421,964 in discretionary funds from the New York City Council. The funds were awarded despite previous accusations of mismanagement at the nonprofit and despite Lopez’s departure from office in May because of accusations of sexually harassing staff members.
Eight former Lopez staffers, all young women, described his lurid behavior to state investigators. Some were forced to massage his body. The cancer-stricken Lopez allegedly rubbed the thighs of others — and even forced one woman to feel his tumors. Some of the alleged acts took place during car trips to and from Albany, Long Island and Atlantic City, which might explain why a special prosecutor left open the possibility that crimes were committed outside of Brooklyn.
In addition, Christiana Fisher, the former $782,000 chief executive of the Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of criminal contempt and faces up to six months in prison. Ms. Fisher acknowledged allowing the Brooklyn charity to give a grand jury inaccurate documents that purported to show the council’s board had approved a hefty increase in her pay. She had been involved with the organization since shortly after its incorporation in 1976 by state Assemblyman Vito Lopez but was forced out of her executive position earlier this year.
A Thought or Two:
Failure To Check Background Can Be Heartbreaking
Nonprofit Imperative has monitored the failures of nonprofits to do background checks for more than a decade. The consequences have been horrendous- both financial and emotional.
Let's look at the latest breakdown of a board to exercise due diligence:
Leslie Cohen Berlowitz has overseen the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences honorary society for the past 17 years. She has been put on paid leave from the academy for more than a month while an outside law firm investigates numerous allegations. The charges have engulfed the organization and threatened to tarnish its reputation. Now the Massachusetts Attorney General is investigating also. Apparently, she falsely claimed to have a doctorate from New York University and misstated her work history in federal grant applications. She also came under fire for berating staffers and receiving an oversized pay package — more than $598,000 in fiscal 2012 alone for an organization with only three dozen staffers. The attorney general’s office also asked whether the academy fully reported all her executive perks, such as first-class travel.
The board did not know of the discrepancies in her resume until the Boston Globe brought it to its attention.
Another Honoree Caught in an Alleged Fraud
Michigan physician Farid Fata was an honorable mention in Crain's Health Care Heroes 2011 edition, for launching the Swan for Life Cancer Foundation in 2009 to provide wellness programs and free educational workshops and support services to cancer patients. He now faces charges of health care fraud at U.S. District Court for his role in an alleged $35 million Medicare billing scheme. Prosecutors allege Fata directed that chemotherapy be administered to patients who had other serious medical conditions requiring immediate treatment before permitting them to go to the hospital. In one instance, a male patient fell down and hit his head while visiting the practice, and Fata allegedly insisted he get chemotherapy before going to the emergency room. The patient later died from his head injury, according to prosecutors. In yet another instance, a patient came to Michigan Hematology Oncology Centers with extremely low sodium levels, and Fata allegedly had chemo administered first, before the patient could be hospitalized.
Nonprofit News…
In Case You Missed It:
1      Settlement agreements, exceeding $60 million, between Penn State University and as many as 32 people who say they were abused by former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky could be finalized soon. Sandusky was accused of abusing 10 boys over a 15-year period while working for Penn State and with his charity, The Second Mile. He was convicted in June 2012 of 45 criminal counts of sexual abuse and is serving a 30- to 60-year state prison sentence.
2      The body of 42-year-old William Grooms was found in Bluffton (SC) Park. He was charged last month with stealing money from the Friends of Bluffton Dog Park group
3      Livestrong, the cancer support charity that in November ended its relationship with founder Lance Armstrong because of his use of performance-enhancing drugs, had donations drop 8.1 percent to $22.7 million last year from 2011, according to an Internal Revenue Service filing. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency banned seven-time Tour de France winner Armstrong from cycling in August, and he resigned as Livestrong’s chairman in October. Armstrong said in January that he cheated in all of his tour victories from 1999-2005. Support dropped 25 percent from 2010 levels and 45 percent from its $40.1 million in 2009 donations.
4      From April 2013 to July 2013, 5,649 names were added to the Automatic Revocation List, while 1,000 names were removed. The new grand total of revoked entities is 504,742. The IRS has still not reached its stated goal of listing organizations within one month of revocation: the most recent revocations shown on the July list were effective in April, 2013. (Sandy Deja, www.501c3book.com)
5      For the second time in as many years, nonprofit organizations with a health care mission are being told in some cases that their state funding violates Virginia’s constitution. In a recent advisory opinion, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli determined that a total of about $1.8 million in state funds to 12 nonprofits is impermissible. The Virginia constitution forbids the General Assembly from making “any appropriation of public funds ... to any charitable institution which is not owned or controlled by the Commonwealth,” Cuccinelli wrote in the June 28 opinion.
6      Irony: The former counter-fraud and loss-prevention manager at Oxfam UK has appeared in court accused of defrauding more than £60,000 (about $92,000) from the charity.
7      Apparently there was some confusion as to the recipients are to be at the N.C. Rural Economic Development Center. More than a third have worked for, or are involved with, other organizations that have benefitted from Rural Center grants. At least seven current board members are connected to ongoing projects now waiting on money already awarded by the center. One, Cicely C. McCulloch of Elkin, is expecting $25,000 to help improve a building she owns. At least two current board members have had their compensation paid by the center in the past, with more salary money budgeted this year at a nonprofit in Elizabeth City run by center board member Lenora Jarvis-Mackey, according to documents. Yet another board member, Alan Rice of Yadkinville, was paid a $15,000 “consulting” fee out of a Rural Center grant, billing $103 an hour to a center-approved, taxpayer-funded program he set up to help poor people improve their lives. In April, his nonprofit was awarded a new $75,000 grant. In some cases, current board members benefitted from Rural Center grants prior to the time they joined the center’s board – such as two members who were part of $250,000 and $390,000 awards that helped with buildings for companies they started. All of this is the result of the remarkable investigative reporting at the News & Observer that found that at least 20 of the 47 current board members at the Rural Center took advantage of their trusted position.
8      The president of a bulk mailing company has been sentenced to 30 months in prison for defrauding charities and nonprofits by failing to provide contracted services. He was also ordered to forfeit more than $600,000 that the charities lost. RMS Direct Inc., a mail preparation service, authorities say, mailed items late or not at all, but still charged clients.
9      Former Luzerne County Judge Mark Ciavarella Jr. was sentenced to 28 years in federal prison for taking $1 million in bribes from the builder of a pair of juvenile detention centers in a case that became known as "kids-for-cash." Ciavarella, known for his harsh and autocratic courtroom demeanor, filled the beds of the private lockups with children as young as 10, many of them first-time offenders convicted of petty theft and other minor crimes. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court tossed about 4,000 convictions issued by Ciavarella between 2003 and 2008, saying he violated the constitutional rights of the juveniles.
10   In 2010 and 2011, Charles W. Fleming was the treasurer of the Cattle Growers Foundation.  During this time, approximately 20 checks totaling approximately $296,000.00 were issued by Fleming and deposited in his personal bank account in Clovis, NM. In February 2013, the Cattle Growers President contacted law enforcement about his concerns regarding the accounting practices of the foundations former treasurer, Charles Fleming. Now, law Enforcement officers from New Mexico and Texas are actively seeking the former Clovis, NM, certified public accountant, who is wanted on 20 charges of embezzlement. 
11   In June, the N.M. Human Services Department froze payments to 15 nonprofits that provide mental health and substance abuse services after an audit found what the agency said was a high rate of billing problems and possible mismanagement. TeamBuilders Counseling Services Inc., is the focus where the owners are said to make an estimated as much as $1.5 million a year in salaries and other income. The Albuquerque Journal reports that an audit found that the nonprofit made lease payments of more than $3.3 million from 2006 through 2011 to limited liability companies owned in full or part. The owners, Shannon Freedle is TeamBuilders' CEO, and Lorraine Freedle, a pediatric neuropsychologist, is its clinical director. According to the audit, in the fiscal year 2012, Shannon Freedle got a 71 percent raise, increasing his compensation to $252,000, while Lorraine Freedle got a 46 percent raise, bringing her compensation to $203,000.
12   Nonprofit Finance Fund Survey results are interesting:
·       42% of survey respondents report that they do not have the right mix of financial resources to thrive and be effective in the next 3 years.
·       1 in 4 nonprofits has 30 days or less cash-on-hand.
·       Over the next twelve months, 39% plan to change the main ways they raise and spend money.
·       23% will seek funding other than grants or contracts, such as loans or investments.
·       For the first time in the five years of the survey, more than half (52%) of respondents were unable to meet demand over the last year; 54% say they won’t be able to meet demand this year.
·       49% have added or expanded programs or services; 17 percent reduced or eliminated programs or services.
·       39% have collaborated with another organization to improve or increase services.
·      39% have upgraded technology to improve organizational efficiency.
·      36% engaged more closely with their board.
Justice Watch
Judges, prosecutors and others have coddled criminals convicted of charity fraud in their sentencing…and it is rampant. All use jail overcrowding and other spurious excuses for lenient prosecution and sentencing. Restitution is frequently ordered in lieu of prison, but it is seldom discharged with less than 50% of the criminals even paying one penny. This result is a free pass for the criminals. We are watching!! (just a few examples).
1.     A South Carolina man accused of stealing more than $1 million of taxpayer money by submitting false nursing home financial reports pleaded guilty to the charges against him, but he will not go to jail for the crimes. The court did not sentence Cooke to jail time because the judge said he could not pay back all the money he owes to the state while behind bars.
2.     After pleading guilty to eight counts of violating the state's computer crimes act because he used a computer to make $58,000 in unauthorized purchases with a church-issued credit card, he received a 10-year deferred sentence and 500 hours of community service
3.     Joseph Schlieve pleaded no contest to one count of theft in a business (church) setting of greater than $10,000. Nine additional counts of theft in a business setting of greater than $10,000, four counts of identity theft to obtain money and an uncharged sheriff’s department case were dismissed, was placed on five years of probation.
4.     Ocean Springs (MS) School District bookkeeper Linda Dickerson Smeby, pleaded guilty to four counts of embezzlement. Smeby was sentenced to 10 years suspended, placed on probation for five years under supervision of the MDOC, and ordered to pay restitution for the principal amount of $9,113.85.
5.     The U.S. Attorney’s Office has charged the former executive director of the Jefferson County Committee for Economic Opportunity and her daughter in connection with the theft of close to $500,000 from the non-profit organization, announced U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance and FBI Special Agent in Charge Richard D. Schwein, Jr.
6.     A former Alameda County (CA) Superior Court judge charged with swindling a 97-year-old neighbor out of her life savings pleaded no contest to elder abuse and perjury and will not face jail time.
7.     Failure of background checks:
a.     The News Journal reported that the criminal background of Dr. Frederick “Freddie” Asinor — Delaware State University’s former dean of the College of Education, Health and Public Policy — included forgery and embezzlement crimes committed while working at Clemson University. The Delaware State News reported Dr. Asinor had resigned. Court records showed that Freddie Asinor pleaded guilty to breach of trust, forgery, and embezzlement of public funds on March 21, 1991 in Pickens County (S.C.) 13th Judicial Circuit. The arrest date was listed in papers as July 12, 1990.
b.    A woman who is suspected of embezzling nearly $200,000 from Escondido Pop Warner Football League and another business in California is now being charged with embezzlement of at least $80,000 from the Ramada Inn in Lewiston, ME). She was arrested
c.     The executive director of YWCA Lincoln was sentenced in court for embezzling thousands of dollars from another past employer just days before being charged with embezzling more than $34,700 from the nonprofit.
We flagged these few examples of nonprofit mischief 
1.     Oceanside Elks Lodge CA $170,000
2.     International Union of Painters and Allied Trades Local 460 (IN) $30,000
3.     National Wildlife Federation $78,000; Special Olympics $11,000
4.     Pam’s Promise/ Advocates Helping to Educate Against Drugs (IN) Unknown
5.     DuPage County (IL) Employees Credit Union $3000
6.     Whistlestop (CA) $60,000
7.     Keely’s District Boxing and Youth Center (DC) $205,000
8.     Advocates Helping to Educate Against Drugs  (AHEAD) (IN) thousands
9.     St. Mark Church in Kendall and St. Mary in Holley (NY) $128,000
10.  Women In Support of the Million Man March Inc. (Ace Alliance Inc) millions
11.  The One Fund (NY) $480,000
12.  Allegheny Health Network (PA) $713,000
13.  Friends of the Conservatory (WA) $66,000
14.  Northeast Kentucky Community Action Agency $75,000
15.  LSU Eunice (LA) $160,000
16.  First Presbyterian Church of Corning (NY) $18,640 
17.  Idaho County Food Bank $50,000
18.  Local Laborers 1358 (NY) $9,000
19.  Research Foundation of the State University of New York $165,000
20.  American Federation of Government Employees Local 2263 (NM) $6700
21.  Glass, Molders, Pottery and Plastics & Allied Workers International Union Local 45 (OH) $4300
22.  Pioneers Memorial Healthcare District (CA) over $90,000
23.  Mountaineer Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association (OH) $1.3 million
24.  Miami Beach Community Health Center (FL) $7 million
25.  The View Church, formerly First Baptist Church (IL) $100,000
26.  Theta Delta Chi (@Penn State) $38,000
27.  First Samoan Christian Congregational Church  (CA) $100,000
28.  Glenpool Youth Sports (OK) $1000
29.  Three Rivers Little League (MI) <$20,000
30.  Social Circle (GA) $1.5 million
31.  New Haven Community Schools (MI) $1858
Political/public official chicanery (just a few):
1.     Former Lawrence Township Mayor Mark W. Holmes was charged with theft after he allegedly stole more than $75,000 in state money while he was the Asbury Park Housing Authority executive director.
2.     Van Holmes, president of the Young Leaders Institute the head of the Queens nonprofit tied to ex-state Sen. Shirley Huntley surrendered to police today on charges he stole $88,000 in taxpayer money to fund personal expenses like dining out and new clothes. Also under investigation is former Councilman James Sanders (D-Queens), now a state senator, who allocated funds to the group when he was in the council.
3.     Legislative auditors criticized the state for spending nearly $600,000 to renovate an abandoned schoolhouse in northern New Mexico and later selling the still unfinished building for $39,000 to a nonprofit group that originally donated it.
4.     Former Weybridge Town Clerk (VT) pleaded guilty to embezzling $431,000 in funds from the town’s coffers over a period of at least six years. She was sentenced to two years in prison 
5.     The Utah Attorney General's Office arrested a former Park City Police Department sergeant on charges that he embezzled upward of $65,000 over a five-year span from the department and two fraternal police organizations.
6.     Former (IL) State Rep. Constance A. “Connie” Howard, a once-prominent South Side Democrat, pleaded guilty to a single count for skimming tens of thousands of dollars from a charity she created and using the cash for “personal and political” purposes.
7.     The former treasurer of a Loudoun County volunteer fire department has pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $600,000. He faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison. According to a statement of facts, Cromer was treasurer of the Aldie Volunteer Fire Department (DC) from 1995 to 2012. Prosecutors say he embezzled the money to pay his mortgage and credit card bills. 
8.     A mechanic who embezzled $17,700 from the California Highway Patrol will serve no more than six months in a San Mateo County jail after reaching a plea agreement.
9.     A political aide from Glendale has been found guilty of federal wire fraud charges. A federal jury in Phoenix found John Rowland Mills, 49, guilty of the charges. Mills was accused of embezzling $133,000 in campaign funds from Jim Weiers’ legislative campaign account in 2008.He used the money to make mortgage payments, pay off credit card bills, purchase personal items and make investments through a number of E-Trade accounts, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Arizona.
10.  Gloria Gonzalez, a former Gridley (CA) city employee, pleaded guilty to felony counts of embezzling money from the city's employee health savings reimbursement account and cashing city checks not issued to her, cashing a check with non-sufficient funds, filing a false tax return and receiving a fraudulent tax refund. She also admitted the special allegation that she took more than $200,000. Her daughter and her husband Bianca Gonzalez and Ramirez pleaded to felony counts of grand theft, cashing a check with non-sufficient funds and filing a fraudulent tax return. They admitted the special allegation that their total amount was over $100,000.
11.  Former Salton Sea Beach Fire Protection District Chief Ronald Hall was arrested on suspicion of embezzlement.
12.  A former Rhode Island municipal court clerk was accused of embezzling nearly $400,000.
Tell us what you think and continue the tips (they are very helpful) gary.r.snyder@gmail.com
Nonprofit Imperative gathers its information principally from public documents...some of which are directly quoted. Virtually all cited are in some phase of criminal proceedings; some have not been charged, however there is money missing.
Cites in various media:
Featured in print, broadcast, and online media outlets, including: Charity Navigator, Vermont Public Radio, Miami Herald, National Public Radio (NPR), Huffington Post, The Sun News, Atlanta Journal Constitution, Wall Street Journal (Profile, News and Photos), “Betrayal”, (a movie), NBC (on Charity Fraud…TBD), FOX2, ABC Spotlight on the News, WWJ Radio, Marie Claire, Ethics World, Aspen Philanthropy Newsletter, Harvard Business Review, Current Affairs, Charity Navigator, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, St. Petersburg Times, Board Room Insider, USA Today Topics, Accountants News, Newsweek.com, Responsive Philanthropy Magazine, New York Times, Portfolio Magazine, The Virgin Islands Daily News, NANKAI (China) BUSINESS REVIEW, National Religious Broadcasters newsletter, The Charity Governance Blog, American Chronicle, Palm Beach Post, Detroit Free Press, Oakland Press, Nonprofit World, Socially Responsible Business Forum, PNNOnline, Ohio Nonprofit Resources, Nonprofit Good Practice Guide, Nonprofit Startup Guide, Nonprofit Blog, National Coalition of Homeless Newsletter, Finance and Administration Roundtable Newsletter, MichiganNonprofit.com, CORP! Magazine, Crain’s Michigan Nonprofit, ncrp.org, PhilanTopic, Nashville Free Press, Nonprofit Law Blog, Seniors World Chronicle, Carnegie Reporter, Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examiners Examiner, msnbc.com, Worchester (MA) Telegram and Gazette, Carnegie Corporation of America, EO Tax Journal, Parent: Wise Austin, Accountants News, Veterans Today, Answers.com, Far-roundtable, #Nonprofit Report, nonprofithelpnews, nonprofit news; National Enquirer, Northwest Herald, The HelpWise Daily, The #Nonprofit Report, Wikipedia (Nonprofit Organization), Answers.com,
  • Silence: The Impending Threat to the Charitable Sector (Xlibris, 2011)
  • Nonprofits: On the Brink (iUniverse, 2006)
  • The Michigan Nonprofit Management Manual, Governance Section
Our intent is to keep you informed.... You may be removed from our contact list and future mailings by emailing to garysnyder4@gmail.com with the word "remove" in the subject line.
Email: gary.r.snyder@gmail.com; 248/324-700;
Gary Snyder is the author of Silence: The Impending Threat to the Charitable Sector (Xlibris, June, 2011) and Nonprofits: On the Brink (iUniverse, February, 2006) and articles in numerous publications. The book can be bought at amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com, Barnes and Noble (store)
© Gary R. Snyder, All Rights Reserved, 2013






















Nonprofit Imperative gathers its information principally from public documents...some of which are directly quoted. Virtually all cited are in some phase of criminal proceedings; some have not been charged, however. Cites in various media: Featured in print, broadcast, and online media outlets, including: Charity Navigator, Vermont Public Radio, Miami Herald, National Public Radio (NPR), Huffington Post, The Sun News, Atlanta Journal Constitution, Wall Street Journal (Profile, News and Photos), “Betrayal”, (a movie), NBC (on Charity Fraud…TBD), FOX2, ABC Spotlight on the News, WWJ Radio, Marie Claire, Ethics World, Aspen Philanthropy Newsletter, Harvard Business Review, Current Affairs, Charity Navigator, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, St. Petersburg Times, Board Room Insider, USA Today Topics, Accountants News, Newsweek.com, Responsive Philanthropy Magazine, New York Times, Portfolio Magazine, The Virgin Islands Daily News, NANKAI (China) BUSINESS REVIEW, National Religious Broadcasters newsletter, The Charity Governance Blog, American Chronicle, Palm Beach Post, Detroit Free Press, Oakland Press, Nonprofit World, Socially Responsible Business Forum, PNNOnline, Ohio Nonprofit Resources, Nonprofit Good Practice Guide, Nonprofit Startup Guide, Nonprofit Blog, National Coalition of Homeless Newsletter, Finance and Administration Roundtable Newsletter, MichiganNonprofit.com, CORP! Magazine, Crain’s Michigan Nonprofit, ncrp.org, PhilanTopic, Nashville Free Press, Nonprofit Law Blog, Seniors World Chronicle, Carnegie Reporter, Assoc. of Certified Fraud Examiners Examiner, msnbc.com, Worchester (MA) Telegram and Gazette, Carnegie Corporation of America, EO Tax Journal, Wikipedia: Non-profit Organizations; Parent: Wise Austin, Accountants News, Veterans Today, Answers.com, Far-roundtable, #Nonprofit Report, nonprofithelpnews, nonprofit news; National Enquirer, Northwest Herald, The HelpWise Daily, The #Nonprofit Report, Wikipedia (Nonprofit Organization), Answers.com, Nonprofits: On the Brink (2006) Silence: The Impending Threat to the Charitable Sector (2011)
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